Chosen – O. M. Faure

Anyone who believes in indefinite growth on a physically finite plant is either mad, or an economist. Sir David Attenborough

Our view throughout this novel is split between two successful women, Olivia, and DeAnn. Olivia is a successful lawyer but failing in her personal life due to a downward spiralling relationship and a series of unsuccessful IVF treatments. DeAnn likes to think she is better, stronger and more resilient than the “Snow White” she meets in Olivia, but although she is a big time doctor in America DeAnn is struggling to make emotional connections with everyone she meets and pushes everyone away. They meet in an assessment interview for a mysterious company who will not discuss anything about the job until the candidates are selected and vetted after a long process of rigorous tests.


I found the opening of this story to be so enticing, I didn’t want to put it down until I found out what was going on with the secret lab tests and what this super secret job was going to be. The story seemed to flick by quite quickly without much happening as we followed the two women through the interview/assessment process and then (spoiler alert) into their roles with “The Programme” after being hired. Then we were shot through a series of events that found them transported somewhere totalling new and they had no idea how to get back or survive in this new world. The pace quickened at just the right speed for it to not jolt me forward without realising what was happening but still quick enough to keep me flicking through the pages to find out more.


The new world that Faure creates is not too distant from our own, so imagining it in my mind was easy along with the clear writing. The image in my brain was just that of our current world, plus a few billion more people, and a super exaggerated version of the future. I really enjoyed the exaggeration to bring this world to life but I felt at times with our main heroines that the exaggeration was too much. Yes, DeAnn is a strong and beautiful woman, but her inner monologue about how much better she thinks she is and how tough she is just came over a little strong, almost as though Faure wanted to make sure the reader is 100% aware of how strong and beautiful she is, however the first half of the book was strong enough to account for both main women and what kind of people they are so, I felt it a little unnecessary as Faure had already created such wonderful personas for the characters.


This book was free on Kindle for a limited time which is why I downloaded it, I read a few bad reviews on it so was really apprehensive about starting it at all, I’m glad I didn’t listen to them because this was a really good read. Okay, it’s not going on my list of top 10 books ever read, but it was interesting and thought-provoking and something you need that in a book. Reading the same thing day-in, day-out can be a little tiresome, so reading a book that meant I came away actually thinking about what it was saying was a really nice change.



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