Duma Key - Stephen King

Edgar Freemantle is involved in a horrific work accident that leaves him without a right arm. Whilst learning to develop his skills again without completely losing his temper (another side-effect of the accident) his wife, Pam, leaves him. As Edgar had built up quite an empire around himself he leaves his home to Pam and finds himself in Duma Key, a small island in Florida. Things start to get strange for Edgar once he arrives on the island, and then even stranger when he meets Elizabeth Eastlake who owns the island and knows all it's little secrets.


King is known for his very descriptive work and long pieces but something about Duma Key just did not want to end. It took me a good month to finish this, but I loved it. For the few of you who read my blog and have done for a while you will know my experience with King has been difficult to say the least, a major issue being the expectations being way too high (see: IT). I had no expectations going into Duma Key, I liked the sound of the synopsis when I picked it up at my local used bookshop and wanted to casually see where it lead me. Immediately I was hooked by King's perfect level of descriptive storytelling and wanted to see where Edgar ended up.


As always the characterisation was flawless, King has a unique way of portraying every character in just enough detail to give them life within the pages. Edgar himself was so developed that we could still determine who he was underneath all of that initial anger, there was more to him than met the eye and that is what the story would be about.


The story itself began relatively normal but once it started to develop there was no going back. I find horror and supernatural plots are difficult to write as you have to strongly rely on the readers imagination to produce what you're trying to depict but King does the hard work for you. So much of the work is done by the interconnected descriptive prose, setting and imagery that the reader themselves just has an image in their mind of the danger without trying to connect those dots themselves. Parts of this novel left me genuinely scared to turn the lights off.


Developing the narrative for this story must have been seriously hard but King produced a wonderful natural progression that ended in a perfect way. Looking back to the beginning there was no other way that the novel could have ended and truly provided an end to Edgar's story.


Whilst being an emotional journey there was still the perfect level of action and horror to make it a staple in King's portfolio. I'm only knocking it down to four stars instead of five because I still don't fully understand the in's and out's of how the bad guy came to be initially and, it was just so long.


If you'd like to get your own copy please use this link: https://amzn.to/2WAJk6Z


©2019 by Read The Week.