Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury

Guy Montag is a fireman but instead of putting them out, he starts them. In this post-literature future books are banned, houses are fireproof and the firemen are employed to solely destroy any artistic expression that provokes controversial opinion or thought. Only Guy doesn't want that, after witnessing a woman who would rather die with her books than live without them he starts to think, is this the best reality for him?


You cannot say you are a 'book nerd' if you have not read, or attempted to read Fahrenheit 451. This has been on my to-be-read for a long time and I finally took the leap the decide if this was worth it's cultist standing. Spoiler; it's not. The opening pages are difficult to follow as we're dropped straight into a story that has already half been developed. Guy already felt his dissociation from the world he lives in, he already has hoarded books in his house and he is already out of love with his wife, Mildred. Joining a character who has already reached their tipping point in this futuristic setting further distracts me from the plot which is already confusing.


In a sad way to end 2019 I had to DNF another book in my final weeks. Page 110 was as far as I could push myself with this and honestly, I couldn't read one more sentence, let alone another page. This book was too 'deep' for it's own good. The story progression was hindered by Bradbury's need to reflect our society through metaphor and imagery of monsters and men restricting our creative outputs.


This may be a book to re-visit when I have progressed my appreciation for 'iconic' literature. Until that time, this is a lower 2 star. The story was interesting when those parts were progressing at a good pace, and I would have loved to see it move along at a constant pace instead of the stop-start narrative.



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