Good Me, Bad Me - Ali Land

Annie becomes Milly, and her mother becomes an arrested serial killer. Milly moves in with a foster family where her new dad, Mike, prepares her for the upcoming trial for convicting her biological mother. As well as dealing with the guilt of turning her mother into the police she also had to deal with a new school, new friends and a new sister, all of which makes her uncomfortable and stirs emotions she had hoped to leave behind.


Initially I was thrown off by the narrative of this novel, it is written as a story from Milly's point of view to her mother about what she is doing and how she is progressing with life without her. Milly is portrayed as a sixteen year old but the beginning of this novel made her seem like she was ten because the language was so restrictive and closed off. Further on in the novel as she develops and becomes more open the language changes with her and it becomes easier to follow her thoughts, but it is a long time to get to this point. It was a slow-burner in terms of narrative, although the story was really intriguing the slow progression of language made this difficult to plow through.


As well as difficult language the stop/start style of writing made for slow progression. Just when something interesting was happening Milly would stop her narration and the story would skip a couple of hours, a day or even a week. Similarly a single hour could take her two chapters to go through. Although the story was about her I found Milly's narration on everything difficult to connect to, the only time I felt any connection to this story was Phoebe's *spoiler* death. She had it coming, she was truly awful but that was the first time I was actually interested in the what happened to Milly. He mother's story was interesting but it lacked a certain mystery , the tension and mystery surrounding Phoebe that hung in the air until the very end.


All in all, I did enjoy this book but it lacked a general something that meant I couldn't love it. The language restrictions seemed intentional and I can appreciate that, but it just meant I couldn't fully enjoy the story.



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