The Becket List - Henry Becket

Illustrated by Tony Husband


The Becket List is a not entirely serious compendium of 'First World Problems' - the sort of stuff that drives us round the bend on a daily basis. How is it that atonal music, bus stations, cling-film and coat-hangers can b*gger us up so comprehensively? Or passport control people, modern poetry, or just about anything you'll find in a typical hotel bedroom? Embracing both the inanimate - from allen keys to rawlplugs - and the animated (well, in some cases) - from your fellow-travellers to every third-rate waiter who ever walked the earth - this book is essential for your sanity. As such, this comprehensive A to Z provides a signal service to humanity.


A big thank you to Helen at Literally PR for including me on this blog tour, as always I appreciate your support! It's a pleasure to close up this tour for you!

This is the perfect coffee table book (or for the adventurous among us, a toilet book) for the grumpy man in your life. The target audience is definitely older gentlemen who have got to the point of life where little annoyances are daily and they need confirmation that they're not alone with them. My personal enjoyment of this book came from the hilarious illustrations that are scattered throughout (courtesy of Tony Husband) that remind me of the cartoons in old newspapers. Also, I couldn't help but giggle with the knowledge I could imagine a few family members saying these exact things.


Whilst I would not recommend this to the light-hearted as it can get a touch on the offensive side if you happen to do any of the things that frustrate Becket but similarly, should you be doing said things in the first place? Becket leaves no annoying-action unturned in his collection of rants, do you have a loud ringtone? Do you misuse the word 'so'? Are you an oyster that won't open? Be warned, Becket is out to get you!


During the terrible year of 2020 we do need some lifting up and this is an be the remedy, it's funny and thoughtful and a touch over the top but it distracts you nicely from the horrors of the world (see; COVID). This isn't a "sit-down and read from cover to cover" book, it's a "I need a pick me up, that's read a couple of entries" book and it hits that mark. I can't say it was an enthralling read, it's not meant to be, it's just meant to let you know you're not alone in your frustrations and hey, who doesn't get annoyed at people eating loudly?


©2019 by Read The Week.